Wednesday, October 21, 2009

A Thousand Words in Idioms (5)

"A Thousand Words in Idioms"

As long as people have been around, they have tried to communicate with each other. As a means of getting the message across as clearly as possible, idioms and sayings have found their way into our language. Now, because "a picture paints a thousand words", I thought it would be nice to make this a photo challenge. The idea is to choose an idiom, or a saying, (even slang is allowed) and illustrate it with a picture.




If "language is the dress of thoughts" ( Johnson), then idioms must the wardrobe


From now on everybody can join in. No need to follow the alphabet, just pick two idioms and illustrate them with your pictures. Grab that camera or look in your archives. Just be creative, that's all I'm asking!
And don't forget to have fun and visit one another, okay?


So here we go ...

Beating around the bush.

It means: When a person is avoiding the main topic. He is not speaking directly about the issue.

Break a leg.

It means: A superstitious way to say 'good luck' without saying 'good luck', but rather the opposite.


7 comments:

Barbara H. said...

Great illustrations of the idioms. I love the kangaroos beating around the bush. And I'm sorry for the person with the broken leg. Is that you?

Jientje said...

Wow, do you have kangaroios where you are? We're lucky if we can see one at the zoo, and there is never enough space for them to beat around the bushes!!
They're both VERY very good! I'm SO going to miss this!!
Thanks for playing Liz!!

Gattina said...

I like the kangaroos hopping around, lol fits perfect to the idiom. the broken leg is less funny !

Mama Zen said...

Excellent pictures!

Fandango said...

We dragons hope you didn't break your leg just to illustrate the idiom. That would be bad luck.
Those kangaroos look tasty.

Dr.John said...

Two good idioms well illustrated. I hope the broken leg picture was from the archives and not recent.

ROSIDAH said...

Great idiom shots! I love the kangaroos, and I hope that the model for the second idiom has already recovered.

 
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